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Issue 105 - August 2010 - Page 15

Pages in this month's issue:
  1. Mars, Earth - Closest Approach in Recorded History
  2. Falsely Attributed Quote - A Norman Rockwell Moment
  3. Telstra Bill Account Update Phishing Scam
  4. Scammers Pose as Microsoft Tech Support Workers to Hijack Computers
  5. Laptop Fire Death Warning Email
  6. Verified By Visa Banking Incident Phishing Scam
  7. St. Augustine Find - Huge Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnake
  8. Free Blackberry Storm for Forwarding Hoax
  9. Five Headed Cobra Hoax Images
  10. AOL Update Billing Information Phishing Scam
  11. Kevin Rudd Fire the Cattle Guards Hoax
  12. Resignation Of Barack Obama Virus Hoax
  13. Decorative Magnets on Refrigerators - Cancer Warning Hoax
  14. Knob Face Trojan Worm Warning Message
  15. Face Book Promotion Advance Fee Scam
  16. BlackBerry RIM Inactive Account Hoax
  17. Circulating Request - Help Pooja Find Her Parents
  18. Black in the White House Virus Hoax
  19. 1954 Home Computer Hoax
  20. Debbie Shwartz Charity Hoax

Issue 105 Start Menu

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Face Book Promotion Advance Fee Scam

Outline
Message posted to Facebook users claims that the account holder has won a large sum of money in the Face Book 2010 promotion.



Brief Analysis
There is no prize and the supposed promotion is bogus. The message is a scam designed to trick Facebook users into sending money and personal information to Internet criminals. Those who reply to the email address listed in the scam message will soon be asked to pay various fees that are supposedly required to allow release of the prize money. They may also be asked to provide personal information which might subsequently be used to steal their identity.

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Detailed analysis and references below example.

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Last updated: 17th July 2010
First published: 17th July 2010
Article written by Brett M. Christensen
About Brett Christensen and Hoax-Slayer


Example
Get back to us immediately you receive this message on ( facebookpromotion10@gmail.com ) if you are the owner of this Face Book Account, Because this account have just WON the total sum of $50,000 ( FIFTY THOUSAND UNITED STATES DOLLARS ) in Face Book 2010 promotion.

Get back immediately to claim your Money.

Contact Department : Payment Department

Contact E-mail : facebookpromotion10@gmail.com

Thank you.
From Face Book Promotion.




Detailed Analysis
This message, which has been sent to a number of users of social networking website Facebook, claims that the owner of the Facebook account has won the sum of $50,000 in the "Face Book 2010 promotion". The account holder is instructed to contact the "Payment Department" immediately via an included email address in order to claim the prize money.

However, the claims in the message are untrue. There is no prize money and the supposed Facebook Promotion does not exist. The message is a scam designed to trick Facebook users into sending money and personal information to Internet criminals. Those who respond as instructed and email the "Payment Department", will soon be asked to send a fee, ostensibly to cover costs associated with the release and transfer of the prize money. The criminals will claim that the prize cannot be transferred until this fee is paid. Furthermore, they will insist that the fee cannot be deducted from the prize itself for legal or insurance reasons. If a victim complies and sends money to cover the fee, requests for further fees are likely to follow. In many such scams, requests for fees will continue until the victim belatedly realizes that he or she is being scammed or simply runs out of funds to send.

During the course of the scam, the criminals may also ask their victim to provide a significant amount of personal information, ostensibly as a means of proving his or her identity and right to claim the supposed prize. Using such requests, the scammers may harvest enough information to steal their victim's identity.

Advance fee prize scams like the one described here are very common. For years, scammers have used email as a method of reaching victims. They have also used letters and faxes, SMS, and phone calls. And, not surprisingly, such criminals have wasted no time in exploiting the popularity of social networking sites such as Facebook as yet another effective means of reaching potential victims.

What ever the vector for attack, people should be very wary of messages that claim that they have won money or prizes in a promotion or lottery that they have never even entered.

Read more information about advance fee lottery scams


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Previous Article            Next Article

Issue 105 Start Menu

Pages in this month's issue:
  1. Mars, Earth - Closest Approach in Recorded History
  2. Falsely Attributed Quote - A Norman Rockwell Moment
  3. Telstra Bill Account Update Phishing Scam
  4. Scammers Pose as Microsoft Tech Support Workers to Hijack Computers
  5. Laptop Fire Death Warning Email
  6. Verified By Visa Banking Incident Phishing Scam
  7. St. Augustine Find - Huge Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnake
  8. Free Blackberry Storm for Forwarding Hoax
  9. Five Headed Cobra Hoax Images
  10. AOL Update Billing Information Phishing Scam
  11. Kevin Rudd Fire the Cattle Guards Hoax
  12. Resignation Of Barack Obama Virus Hoax
  13. Decorative Magnets on Refrigerators - Cancer Warning Hoax
  14. Knob Face Trojan Worm Warning Message
  15. Face Book Promotion Advance Fee Scam
  16. BlackBerry RIM Inactive Account Hoax
  17. Circulating Request - Help Pooja Find Her Parents
  18. Black in the White House Virus Hoax
  19. 1954 Home Computer Hoax
  20. Debbie Shwartz Charity Hoax