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Issue 107 - October 2010 - Page 2

Pages in this month's issue:
  1. UK Pensioners v Asylum Seekers Protest Message
  2. Fake LinkedIn Invitation Emails Point to Malware
  3. Travel Warning - Khas Khas (Poppy Seed) Imprisonment in UAE
  4. Harry Potter Author J.K. Rowling Avowed Satanist Hoax
  5. Bogus Microsoft Critical Upgrade Notification Email
  6. Moon Split Miracle Chain Letter
  7. Death From Poisoned Rhino Horn Rumour
  8. Gang Initiation Warning Hoax - Infant Car Seat Left On Roadside
  9. Collapse Of 13 Story Building in China
  10. Rebirth Of The Eagle Hoax
  11. Facebook Virus Using Your Pictures Warning
  12. Kleneus66 Virus Hoax
  13. Spider Under Florida Toilet Seat Hoax
  14. Facebook Hacked 'BBC News Team' Warning Message

Issue 107 Start Menu

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Fake LinkedIn Invitation Emails Point to Malware

Outline
Emails purporting to be from social network LinkedIn ask recipients to click a link to view pending invitation messages.



Brief Analysis
The emails are not from LinkedIn. Links in the bogus emails open websites that contain malware.

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Detailed analysis and references below example.



Last updated: 27th September 2010
First published: 27th September 2010
Article written by Brett M. Christensen
About Brett Christensen and Hoax-Slayer


Example
Subject: LinkedIn Alert

LinkedIn
REMINDERS
Invitation reminders:
From [Name Removed] (Friend)

PENDING MESSAGES

There are a total of 2 messages awaiting your response. Visit your InBox now.

Don't want to receive email notifications? Adjust your message settings.

LinkedIn Malware Email




Detailed Analysis
Malicious emails purporting to be from popular business orientated online network LinkedIn are currently being distributed. The emails, which look like official LinkedIn messages, claim that pending invitations are awaiting the recipient's response and advise him or her to visit the LinkedIn email inbox to view the invitations.

However, the messages are not from LinkedIn and links in the messages do not lead to the LinkedIn website. In fact, all links in the bogus messages point to a website that contains malicious software. Clicking the links opens a page that tries to trick the visitor into downloading and installing the malicious software. The version of the message that I examined pointed to a site that contained a rogue anti-virus program. Alternative versions of the scam messages may open sites that contain other types of malware.

The bogus emails have been designed to resemble genuine LinkedIn messages. Links in the messages have been disguised so that they appear to point to the real LinkedIn website. Internet criminals regularly use such ruses to target users of popular social networks such as LinkedIn, Facebook and Twitter. Be cautious of following links in any emails that purport to be official notifications from such networks. Always check that links in such emails are genuine. Ensure that links in such messages only direct you back to pages on the network's own website.

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LinkedIn - Possible Fraudulent Email
Check Links in HTML Emails



Previous Article            Next Article

Issue 107 Start Menu

Pages in this month's issue:
  1. UK Pensioners v Asylum Seekers Protest Message
  2. Fake LinkedIn Invitation Emails Point to Malware
  3. Travel Warning - Khas Khas (Poppy Seed) Imprisonment in UAE
  4. Harry Potter Author J.K. Rowling Avowed Satanist Hoax
  5. Bogus Microsoft Critical Upgrade Notification Email
  6. Moon Split Miracle Chain Letter
  7. Death From Poisoned Rhino Horn Rumour
  8. Gang Initiation Warning Hoax - Infant Car Seat Left On Roadside
  9. Collapse Of 13 Story Building in China
  10. Rebirth Of The Eagle Hoax
  11. Facebook Virus Using Your Pictures Warning
  12. Kleneus66 Virus Hoax
  13. Spider Under Florida Toilet Seat Hoax
  14. Facebook Hacked 'BBC News Team' Warning Message