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Issue 109 - December 2010 - Page 3

Pages in this month's issue:
  1. PDS (Parcel Delivery Service) Premium Rate Scam Warning
  2. Check Your Receipts - Cash Back Scam Warning Email
  3. Christmas Tree App Virus Hoax
  4. Dan Murphy's 30% Off Voucher Hoax
  5. Warning from 'British Ministry of Health' - Danger From Broken Energy Saving Bulbs
  6. Friendship Inquiries Hacker Alert Hoax
  7. 'Strange City in Greece' Photographs
  8. Iceberg Spotted at Cape Town?
  9. Viral Video - Time Traveller in Charlie Chaplin Film?
  10. Bogus Facebook Rumour- Harry Graham Pedophile Warning
  11. Maria at Dell Hospital Money for Forwarding Hoax
  12. 'Very Important Message' Facebook Spam
  13. Optus ADSL Service Cancellation Phishing Scam Email
  14. Postcard Image Virus Hoax
  15. FedEx Incorrect Delivery Address Malware Email
  16. Plea to Help Find Missing Three Year Old Girl - Jewel Strong
  17. Mobile Phone Medical Equipment Warning - Phone Interference Caused Death Hoax
  18. USAA Phishing Scam Email
  19. Hilton Hotel Job Offer Scam Email

Issue 109 Start Menu

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Christmas Tree App Virus Hoax

Outline
Message circulating rapidly on Facebook warns users not to install the "Christmas tree app" because it is a destructive trojan virus.



Brief Analysis
The message is a hoax. There is no virus or trojan like the one described in the message. The warning is invalid and should not be reposted.

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Detailed analysis and references below example.



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Last updated: 24th November 2010
First published: 24th November 2010
Article written by Brett M. Christensen
About Brett Christensen and Hoax-Slayer


Example
WARNING!!! DO NOT LOAD the Christmas tree app. It will crash your computer. Geeksquad says it's one of the WORST trojan viruses there is and it is spreading quickly. Please re-post and let your friends know

Christmas tree app hoax post




Detailed Analysis
According to this warning message that is currently circulating rapidly around social network Facebook, users should be careful not to install a Facebook application called "Christmas tree" because it is a "trojan virus". The message warns that the app has been identified by Geeksquad as one of the worst trojan viruses ever and is spreading quickly. It asks users to repost the warning so that others will know about the supposed threat.

However, the claims in the message are untrue. There is no computer security threat like the one described in the warning. In fact, the warning is just one more in a long line of utterly pointless virus hoaxes that have circulated for years, at first mainly via email and more lately via social networking as well.

Sophos security expert Graham Cluley has denounced the warning as a hoax, noting in a recent blog post:
Thousands of Facebook users are warning each other about a Christmas Tree virus said to be spreading in the form of a rogue application on the social network.

The only problem with this warning? It's utterly bogus.
Moreover, Geeksquad, the entity listed in the bogus warning message as having identified the supposed threat, has denied any involvement, noting in an alert on its website:
In actuality, Geek Squad has not officially investigated this particular application, nor have we identified it as the source of any infections in any cases we have supported.
And the supposed threat is not listed on any reputable computer security site other than those that identify it as a hoax.

In fact, there are a number of Facebook applications that have the words"Christmas Tree" in their names. However, at this time, none appear to pose any security threat to users, certainly not the destructive "trojan virus", discussed in the warning message. Certainly, as with all things Facebook, users should use due caution when following links or installing applications. It is even possible that someone will, at some point, actually create a rogue Facebook application that masquerades as a Christmas tree.

But that vague possibility does nothing whatsoever to justify the continued spread of this nonsensical warning message. It is important that Facebook users check the veracity of the information they send on via reputable sources. Reposting such pointless nonsense will certainly do nothing to help. In fact, continued reposting of such misinformation only adds to the pointless clutter already inundating Facebook. Ironically, because they spread so rapidly and cause so much unnecessary confusion and alarm, such bogus virus warnings often become as much of a nuisance as real computer viruses or worms.

If you receive this hoax message, please do not pass it on to others. And please take a moment to let the original poster know that the information in the warning is false.

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References
Virus Hoaxes
Christmas Tree app virus hoax spreads on Facebook
Geeksquad - Facebook Christmas Tree application



Previous Article            Next Article

Issue 109 Start Menu

Pages in this month's issue:
  1. PDS (Parcel Delivery Service) Premium Rate Scam Warning
  2. Check Your Receipts - Cash Back Scam Warning Email
  3. Christmas Tree App Virus Hoax
  4. Dan Murphy's 30% Off Voucher Hoax
  5. Warning from 'British Ministry of Health' - Danger From Broken Energy Saving Bulbs
  6. Friendship Inquiries Hacker Alert Hoax
  7. 'Strange City in Greece' Photographs
  8. Iceberg Spotted at Cape Town?
  9. Viral Video - Time Traveller in Charlie Chaplin Film?
  10. Bogus Facebook Rumour- Harry Graham Pedophile Warning
  11. Maria at Dell Hospital Money for Forwarding Hoax
  12. 'Very Important Message' Facebook Spam
  13. Optus ADSL Service Cancellation Phishing Scam Email
  14. Postcard Image Virus Hoax
  15. FedEx Incorrect Delivery Address Malware Email
  16. Plea to Help Find Missing Three Year Old Girl - Jewel Strong
  17. Mobile Phone Medical Equipment Warning - Phone Interference Caused Death Hoax
  18. USAA Phishing Scam Email
  19. Hilton Hotel Job Offer Scam Email