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Issue 111 - February 2011 - Page 9

Pages in this month's issue:
  1. 2011 Date Oddity - Birth Year Plus Age Equals 111
  2. False Rumour - US Post Office To Destroy African American Stamps
  3. Bigpond Database Upgrade Phishing Scam
  4. Hoax - Facebook Shutting Down on March 15
  5. Protest Message About Bedfordshire Police Rules Regarding Muslims
  6. Coca Cola Survey Phishing Scam
  7. Hoax Reports Claim Three Giant Spaceships Heading for Earth
  8. ATO Activity Statement Refund Phishing Scam
  9. 'My First St@tus' Rogue Facebook Application
  10. Facebook Deleting Inactive Users Hoax
  11. Hoax Warning - Anthrax in Tide Detergent Packs
  12. Hoax - University of Kentucky Removes Holocaust From Curriculum
  13. Facebook Trojan Email - 'Your Password is Changed'
  14. DNA Test Kit Scam Warning
  15. Phone Text Message Lottery Scams
  16. Question About eBay Item Phishing Scam
  17. Knob Face Trojan Worm Warning Message
  18. 'See Everyone Who Views Your Pr@file' Rogue Facebook Application
  19. McDonald's Survey Phishing Scam Email
  20. Parrot Flower Photographs
  21. AAAAAAA@AAA.AAA - First Address Book Entry Virus Control Hoax
  22. Evan Trembley Missing Child Hoax

Issue 111 Start Menu

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'My First St@tus' Rogue Facebook Application

Outline
Message circulating on Facebook claims to show the poster's "1st St@tus" message and claims that Facebook users can find their own first status post by following a link in the message.



Brief Analysis
The message is a scam. The link in the message goes to a rogue Facebook application that, once installed, can automatically repost the "1st St@tus" message to your wall. It will also try to entice the user into visiting spam websites where they may be tricked into providing personal information, downloading spyware or signing up for expensive SMS phone services. If you receive this message, do not follow the link or install the application.

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Detailed analysis and references below example.

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Last updated: 4th January 2011
First published: 4th January 2011
Article written by Brett M. Christensen
About Brett Christensen and Hoax-Slayer


Example
My 1st St@tus was: "THIS Sunday everyone! It's a holiday concert! What better way to get in the spirit for the Holidays?". This was p0sted on 12/10/10

Find your 1st St@tus @ [removed]

My 1st St@tus Example 1

My 1st St@tus Example 2




Detailed Analysis
This message, which is currently circulating very rapidly around social network Facebook, claims to show the poster's "1st St@tus" message and the date the message was posted. It also claims that the user can find his or her own first status message by clicking a link included in the post.

However the message is not what it seems. Clicking the link opens a Facebook page that requests permission for the "Your First Status" application to access your Facebook account information and post to your wall. Once you grant this permission, the "1st St@tus" message will be automatically posted to your wall along with a link to the application. The "1st St@tus" message and date keeps changing but is certainly not a copy of the actual first message posted by the account holder.

After granting permission to the rogue application, you will next be directed to another webpage where you are told that you must participate in one of several available "surveys" before you can view your first status post as promised. However, the "survey" links actually point to a series of spammy third party websites that use very deceptive and unethical marketing tactics.

Some of these third party sites ask you to provide contact and other personal information, ostensibly in order to enter a competition or be eligible for an "offer" of some description. However, the "fine print" on the pages suggests that the details you provide will actually be shared with other marketers and used to send you advertising material. Other sites in the "list" will suggest that you download "helpful" free applications or browser add-ons. However, far from being helpful, these applications and add-ons are in fact likely to collect data from your computer or display unwanted adverts. And some of the links also lead to suspect "survey" websites where you may be tricked into signing up for extremely expensive SMS phone services. These sites claim that you must sign up for such SMS services in order to receive the results of the "survey" in which you participated.

If you see this 'My First St@tus' message when on Facebook, do not follow the link in the message. Do not give permission for "Your First Status" application to access your account information. And take a moment to make your Facebook friends aware that the 'My First St@tus' messages are connected to a rogue Facebook application that should not be installed.

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References
Phony first Facebook status messages lead to rogue application
Beware of Dubious Facebook 'Free Offer' Groups



Previous Article            Next Article

Issue 111 Start Menu

Pages in this month's issue:
  1. 2011 Date Oddity - Birth Year Plus Age Equals 111
  2. False Rumour - US Post Office To Destroy African American Stamps
  3. Bigpond Database Upgrade Phishing Scam
  4. Hoax - Facebook Shutting Down on March 15
  5. Protest Message About Bedfordshire Police Rules Regarding Muslims
  6. Coca Cola Survey Phishing Scam
  7. Hoax Reports Claim Three Giant Spaceships Heading for Earth
  8. ATO Activity Statement Refund Phishing Scam
  9. 'My First St@tus' Rogue Facebook Application
  10. Facebook Deleting Inactive Users Hoax
  11. Hoax Warning - Anthrax in Tide Detergent Packs
  12. Hoax - University of Kentucky Removes Holocaust From Curriculum
  13. Facebook Trojan Email - 'Your Password is Changed'
  14. DNA Test Kit Scam Warning
  15. Phone Text Message Lottery Scams
  16. Question About eBay Item Phishing Scam
  17. Knob Face Trojan Worm Warning Message
  18. 'See Everyone Who Views Your Pr@file' Rogue Facebook Application
  19. McDonald's Survey Phishing Scam Email
  20. Parrot Flower Photographs
  21. AAAAAAA@AAA.AAA - First Address Book Entry Virus Control Hoax
  22. Evan Trembley Missing Child Hoax