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Issue 116 - July 2011 - Page 9

Sheikh Zayed House Hoax

Issue 116 Start Menu

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Outline
Message claims that a series of attached images depict, not a hotel as the viewer might first assume, but the vast and luxurious house of Sheikh Zayed bin Sultan Al Nahyan, the former president of the United Arab Emirates.



Brief Analysis
The claims in the message are untrue. Despite the suggestion in the message, the building is indeed a hotel, namely the Emirates Palace hotel in Abu Dhabi. It is not and never has been the house of the late Sheikh Zayed bin Sultan Al Nahyan.

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Detailed analysis and references below example.

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Last updated: 17th June 2011
First published: 17th June 2011
Article written by Brett M. Christensen
About Brett Christensen and Hoax-Slayer


Example
Subject: FW: It's a House!!

In case you're wondering where this hotel is, it isn't a hotel at all. It is a house! It's owned by the family of Sheikh Zayed bin Sultan Al Nahyan, the former president of the United Arab Emirates and ruler of Abu-Dhabi.

AND WE WERE WONDERING WHY WE ARE PAYING SO MUCH FOR GASOLINE? HMMMMMMMM.

Sheikh Zayed House Hoax 1

Sheikh Zayed House Hoax 2

Sheikh Zayed House Hoax 3

Sheikh Zayed House Hoax 4

Sheikh Zayed House Hoax 5

Sheikh Zayed House Hoax 6

Sheikh Zayed House Hoax 7

Sheikh Zayed House Hoax 8

Sheikh Zayed House Hoax 9

Sheikh Zayed House Hoax 10

Sheikh Zayed House Hoax 11




Detailed Analysis
According to this message, which has circulated via email and social media for several years, a series of attached photographs show a palatial house owned by the family of former United Arab Emirates president, Sheikh Zayed bin Sultan Al Nahyan.

However, despite the disclaimer in the message, the building shown in the photograph is indeed a large and luxurious hotel, not a house owned by Sheikh Zayed or his family. The structure in the photographs shows the Emirates Palace hotel in Abu Dhabi. Many photographs the same as or very similar to those in the circulating message can be seen on the Emirates Palace website and via parent company Kempinski's Image Library.

If you are thinking of staying at the hotel, don't forget your wallet! The domed ceiling Palace Suite shown in the seventh picture above will set you back around 25000 AED (6800 USD) for a "Weekend Break".

For the record, while the pictures do not depict his house, Zayed bin Sultan Al Nahyan was indeed ruler of Abu Dhabi and president of the UAE for over 30 years. He died in November, 2004.

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References
Emirates Palace
Kempinsk Image Library
Zayed bin Sultan Al Nahyan



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Issue 116 Start Menu

Pages in this month's issue:
  1. Amazing Hand Paintings The Work of Artist Guido Daniele
  2. F-Secure 'Security Maintenance' Password Phishing Scam
  3. No Ordinary Bus - Robert Mugabe's Luxury Bus Protest Message
  4. Rugby World Cup Advance Fee Lottery Scam
  5. South African Giant Rats Risk Alert
  6. McDonald's 'Free Dinner Day' Malware Email
  7. Overblown Facebook Warning: Remove All Profile Pics With Kids
  8. Exhibit B-5 Viral Video - Girl Gets Hit By Car After Prank Goes Wrong
  9. Sheikh Zayed House Hoax
  10. Lightning Storm Meets Volcanic Eruption Photos
  11. Facebook Warning - Applications Sending Porno Messages in Your Name
  12. Paypal 'Strange IP from a Different Location' Phishing Scam
  13. Black Van Child Abduction Alert - Number Plate Ending With 03A
  14. 'New Way to Hack Your Face Book' Warning Message
  15. Western Union 'Too Many Login Attempts' Phishing Scam
  16. Domain Name Application Scam
  17. Direct TV Treatment of Joplin Tornado Victims Protest Message
  18. Diversity Visa Lottery Green Card Scam
  19. Becoming a Father or Mother Facebook Group Pedophile Warning Hoax
  20. Elephant 'Road Rage' in South Africa