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Issue 119 - October 2011 - Page 9

Harly A. Andrews Prayer Request

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Outline
Social media driven message asks users to pray for five year old Harly A. Andrews. According to the message, Harly was hit by a car and is in intensive care.



Brief Analysis
So far, the accident described in the message remains unsubstantiated. It is currently unclear if the message describes a real case, or is just another version of an increasing number of absurd prayer request hoaxes that circulate via Facebook and other social networking sites. The message appears to be a reworking of another unsubstantiated prayer request involving a child named Diego Mendez.

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Detailed analysis and references below example.



Last updated: 31st August 2011
First published: 31st August 2011
Article written by Brett M. Christensen
About Brett Christensen and Hoax-Slayer


Example
ATTENTION ALL MY FRIENDS. TODAY I NEED YOU. I NEED TO SEE THIS MESSAGE ON YOUR WALLS!!! URGENT!!! I ASK FOR A PRAYER FOR HARLY. A .ANDREWS (5 YEARS OLD), SHE GOT HIT BY A CAR IN INTENSIVE CARE. PLEASE POST THIS ON YOUR WALL FOR AT LEAST AN HOUR; I WOULD DO IT FOR YOUR BABY GIRL . LET'S GO FOR A MIRACLE!!! IT'S A PRAYER YOU MAY LOSE OUT ON.

Harly A .Andrews Prayer Request




Detailed Analysis
The message, which is currently travelling very rapidly via Facebook and Twitter as well as email, asks recipients to offer prayers for the recovery of five year old Harly A. Andrews. According to the message, Harly "got hit by a car in intensive care". (Presumably, the poorly worded, ALL CAPS message is attempting to convey that Harly was hit by a car and is now in intensive care as a result, not that she was hit by a car IN intensive care). The message exhorts people to "go for a miracle" by praying for Harly and by posting the information on their networks for "at least an hour".

However, like many other such circulating prayer requests, the message contains very little information about the supposed accident. The message does not say where or when the accident occurred, what injuries the child sustained, or how her recovery is progressing. In fact, given the lack of details, there is no way of confirming if this child even exists. Internet searches on the name Harly A. Andrews reveal only further examples of the above prayer request.

The message is very similar to an earlier prayer request message that asked for support for an injured child named Diego Mendez, and this similarity casts even further doubt on the message's veracity. As the following example of the Diego Mendez version reveals, both appear to be cut from the same cloth:
ATTENTION ALL MY FRIENDS. TODAY I NEED YOU. I NEED TO SEE THIS MESSAGE ON YOUR WALLS!!! URGENT!!! I"M ASKING FOR A PRAYER FOR DIEGO MENDEZ (5 YEARS OLD), A TV FELL ON HIS LITTLE HEAD AND HE'S IN INTENSIVE CARE. PLEASE POST THIS ON YOUR WALL FOR AT LEAST AN HOUR; I WOULD DO IT FOR YOUR SON. LET'S GO FOR A MIRACLE.
It seems clear that someone has used the Diego Mendez version as a template by simply substituting the information pertaining to Harly and relaunching the message anew. If Harly is a real child and she has suffered an accident, then reusing a dubious and unverified existing message as a template for a support request was exceedingly unwise on the part of her supporters.

A common theme of late among such requests is that uses should repost the message on their social networks for "at least an hour". This, in itself, seems rather absurd. If you were to post such a message on your wall, why would you bother to go back an hour or more after posting and remove it? The request makes little sense.

In any case, sending on completely unverified prayer requests for people that you have never met and know nothing whatsoever about seems absurd and more than a little pointless.

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References
Diego Mendez Prayer Request



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Issue 119 Start Menu

Pages in this month's issue:
  1. Jordon Mills Prayer Request
  2. Amy Bruce Charity Hoax Revisited
  3. 'Australian Taxation Office 'New Rules' Malware Emails
  4. Bogus Facebook Virus Warning - 'Pornographic Movies Posted On Our Behalf'
  5. Are UK Companies Required by Law To Transfer 0800 Callers to UK Based Reps If Requested?
  6. Australia Post Undelivered Package Malware Emails
  7. Hoax: Picture of Shark Swimming in Flooded Street After Hurricane Irene
  8. Circulating Health Warning: Beware of Little White and Black Caterpillars
  9. Harly A. Andrews Prayer Request
  10. UEFA EURO 2012 Email Draw Advance Fee Scam
  11. Farmville White Gift Box Virus Warning Hoax
  12. Sleazy Online Dating Emails Carry Malware
  13. 'New Antivirus Update for Windows' Scam Email
  14. Western Union 'Money Transfer' Trojan Email
  15. Bob Katter and the 'Labor Party's Worst Nightmare' Polemic
  16. Hoax - Collect Bottle Caps For Free Cancer Chemotherapy Treatment
  17. 'Your Credit Card is Blocked' Malware Emails