Debunking email hoaxes and exposing Internet scams since 2003!


Hoax-Slayer Logo Hoax-Slayer Logo

DividerDivider
Home    About    New Articles    RSS Feed    Subscriptions    Contact
DividerDivider
Bookmark and Share









Issue 121 - December 2011 - Page 9

Phone Text Message Lottery Scams

Issue 121 Start Menu

Previous Article            Next Article

Outline
Phone text (SMS) messages claim that the recipient has won a substantial sum of money in an online lottery or promotion.



Brief Analysis
There is no prize and the lottery or promotion mentioned in the messages does not exist. The messages are lures used to entice recipients into replying to scammers and sending them money and personal information.

Bookmark and Share
Detailed analysis and references below example.

Enter your email address to subscribe to the Hoax-Slayer Newsletter:




Scroll down to submit comments
Last updated: 21st November 2011
First published: 10th January 2011
Article written by Brett M. Christensen
About Brett Christensen and Hoax-Slayer


Examples
Your mobile Number has WON 1, 615,000 Million Pounds in Apple iPhone UK. Ref No:NK115G. For claim Email your name, Country & Occupation to:
freeappleiphone@w.cn

Text Message advance fee scam


CONGRAT!! YOUR MOBILE NUMBER HAS WON FOR YOU $2,000,000 USD IN THE FREE LOTTO MOBILE PROMO. FOR CLAIM, SEND EMAIL: ************@live.com & CALL: [Number removed]

CONGRATULATION
your mobile number has won 500000 pounds in the ongoing NOKIA UK MOBILE PROMO for claims call [Removed] E-mail [Removed]



Detailed Analysis
Recent submissions suggest that advance fee scammers are increasingly using phone text (SMS) messages as a means of gaining new victims. These unsolicited text messages claim that the recipient's mobile phone number has been selected as the winning entry in a lottery or promotion. The texts claim that the "lucky" recipient has therefore won a substantial sum of money or, in some versions, a valuable prize such as a car. To claim their prize, recipients are instructed to call or email via contact details included in the message.

In reality, the lotteries or promotions mentioned in the text messages do not exist. There is no prize. The promised prize is simply the bait used to entice recipients in to contacting the criminals responsible for the scam. Those who fall for the ruse and make contact as instructed will soon be asked to send money, ostensibly in order to allow the release and transfer of the supposed prize. The scammers will claim that this money is required to cover expenses such as tax, legal, insurance or banking fees. They will insist that these fees cannot be deducted from the prize itself. If a victim complies and sends the first fee requested, the scammers will invent other "expenses" that must be paid in advance before the prize can be handed over. Requests for money are likely to continue until the victim belatedly realizes that he or she is being conned or, in some sad cases, simply runs out of money to send. During the course of the scam, the victim may also inadvertently hand over a substantial amount of personal and financial information, supposedly as a means of proving identity and allowing transfer of the "prize money". The scammers may subsequently use this information to steal their victim's identity.

Advance fee lottery scams are certainly not new. Like other types of advance fee scam, they have been around for many years. Advance fee scammers use a variety of methods to reach potential victims, including email, surface mail, fax, social networking and, as in the versions discussed here, SMS. The scammers often claim that the prize or promotion is connected to a high-profile company such as Nokia or Microsoft. The scammers use the names, and, sometimes, the logos and trademarks of such companies without permission as a means of making their claims seem more legitimate. In other cases, the scammers may claim that their scam message is from a real lottery entity such as the UK's National Lottery. Again the scammers use the names and details of these lottery entities without their permission or knowledge.

People need to be very cautious of any unsolicited message that claims that they have won money or a prize in some form of lottery or promotion that they have never even entered. Be wary of any message in any format that claims that your name, phone number or email address has been randomly selected as the winner of a substantial prize. Genuine lotteries do not operate in this manner. If you receive such a scam message, do not reply or respond to the scammers in any way.

Bookmark and Share

References
SMS Advance Fee Prize Scam
Email Lottery Scams - International Lottery Scam Information
Microsoft World Lottery Scam
UK National Lottery Scams



Previous Article            Next Article

Issue 121 Start Menu

Pages in this month's issue:
  1. Bogus Warning - Scammers Asking for Baby Details to Claim Benefits in Your Children's Names
  2. False Claim - Cardiff City Football Club Refused to Donate Club Shirt for Fallen Soldier's Coffin
  3. Summer Chain Email - Blond Hair And Blood Shot Eyes
  4. Facebook Account Reported Phishing Scam
  5. Christmas Tree App Virus Hoax
  6. Sears Supports Reservist Employees Email Forward
  7. False Claim - Colour Photographs of Hitler Taken by American Life Photographer
  8. Budweiser Frogs Virus Hoax
  9. Phone Text Message Lottery Scams
  10. Skype TopUp Payment PayPal Phishing Scam
  11. Hoax - Mark Zuckerberg Blames Facebook Porn Attack on the Philippines
  12. 'DGTFX Virus' Email Account Phishing Scam
  13. Recent Facebook Porn Attack Highlights Dangers of Misleading 'Security' Warnings
  14. False - Send Christmas Cards for Recovering Soldiers to Queen Elizabeth Hospital
  15. Christmas Cards for Recovering American Soldiers
  16. Starbucks Coffee Free Gift Card Survey Scam
  17. Facebook 'Virus' Warning - 'Nobody can watch this for more than 15 seconds' Video
  18. Advance Fee Scam - British National Lottery Promo Programme
  19. Live Ants In The Brain Hoax
  20. Hoax - Albany Bread Poisoned by Staff
  21. PayPal 'Verify to Resolve Account Limitations' Phishing Scam
  22. Red Bull Car Adverts Money Laundering Scam
  23. Hoax - Facebook Shutting Down on March 15
  24. False Warning - Red Dot Inside a Red Square On Chocolate Bars Indicates That Product Contains A Pork Derivative
  25. IT Service Desk 'Scheduled Maintenance & Upgrade' Phishing Scam
  26. Abandoned Two Week Old Sydney Baby Prayer Request
  27. Protest Message - Prison Sentence for Spray Painting Poppy on Mosque
  28. Protest Message - Dog Named 'Parrot' Shot by Police
  29. Inaccurate Protest Message - Poundland and Bodyshop Banning Staff From Wearing Poppies
  30. Apple Store Account Phishing Scam