Debunking email hoaxes and exposing Internet scams since 2003!

Hoax-Slayer Logo Hoax-Slayer Logo

DividerDivider
Home    About    New Articles    RSS Feed    Subscriptions    Contact
DividerDivider


Site Navigation










Issue 141 - October 2012 (2nd Edition) - Page 10

Facebook Survey Scam - 'Drunk 17 Year Old Caught on Tape'

Issue 141 Start Menu

Previous Article            Next Article

Outline
Message making its way across Facebook entices users to click a link to view a "stunning" video of a 17 year old girl caught on tape while drunk at school.



Brief Analysis
The link in the message opens a fake video webpage. Clicking "play" on the bogus video actually "likes" the message and displays it on your Facebook profile. The message then opens another page that claims you must complete a survey to verify your age before viewing the video. After completing the survey, you will be told that you are now in the running to win an expensive prize. However, to go in the draw, you are required to enter your mobile phone number. But, by providing your phone number, you are in fact subscribing to a very expensive - and ongoing - SMS "service" charged at $5 per text message along with a $15 joining fee.

And, after you enter your number and subscribe to the SMS service, you will be taken to further suspect survey pages and asked to provide even more personal information.

No matter how many surveys you complete, you will never get to see the salacious video you were hoping to gain access to. The promise of the video is simply the bait used to entice users into clicking the links in the spam messages.
The scammers who create these bogus promotions will earn commissions via suspect affiliate marketing schemes each and every time a victim completes an offer or participates in a survey. Victims may also be faced with large phone bills for unwanted mobile phone services and, because they have provided name and contact details, they may be inundated with unwanted promotional emails, phone calls and junk mail. And, because clicking the video play button automatically posts the scam message on to the user's Facebook Timeline, victims are also tricked into promoting the scam message to their friends.

Facebook survey scams like this are very common. Be careful of Facebook messages that offer free gifts cards or vouchers, "breaking news", or videos of people caught in compromising situations. If you see such messages on your Facebook, do not click any links that they contain.


Bookmark and Share
Detailed analysis and references below example.

Enter your email address to subscribe to the Hoax-Slayer Newsletter:






Last updated: October 8, 2012
First published: October 8, 2012
Article written by Brett M. Christensen
About Brett Christensen and Hoax-Slayer


Example
[STUNNING!!] She is 17-years-old, she did it publicly in high school while drunk, really stunning!
[Link Removed]
Caught on tape- hOW she did it, AMAZING!!

17 year old caughat on tape scam message


Bookmark and Share

References
What is a Facebook Survey Scam? - Survey Scams Explained
people caught in compromising situations

Previous Article            Next Article

Issue 141 Start Menu

Pages in this issue:
  1. ADP 'Transaction Reports' Malware Email
  2. Facebook 'Virus' Warning Message - Album 92
  3. Dubious Facebook 'Security Alert' - Obama Nation Hackers
  4. Johnny Depp is NOT Dead
  5. Social Media Rumours Falsely Claim Fidel Castro is Dead
  6. Justin Bieber Stolen Laptop and Camera - Sex Tape Rumours
  7. 'Interested in Using Your Photo for Pepsi Ad' - Money Laundering Scam
  8. Hoax - Obama's Cook County Correctional Center
  9. NatWest 'Customer Satisfaction Survey' Phishing Scam
  10. Facebook Survey Scam - 'Drunk 17 Year Old Caught on Tape'
  11. Facebook's Promoted Posts Program for Users Causing Confusion
  12. 'Little Dead Girl Clarissa' Warning - Nasty and Violent Internet Chain Letter
  13. Hoax Warning Message - 'National Kill A Pit Bull Day'
  14. Yorkshire Building Society - Egg Account Transfer Phishing Scam
  15. Skype 'Password Successfully Changed' Scam Email
  16. Michael Vick Did NOT Break His Legs in a Car Accident