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Issue 81 - April 2008 - Page 5

Pages in this month's issue:
  1. Mail Server Report Life is Beautiful Virus Hoax
  2. Bump Car MS-13 Gang Initiation Warning
  3. Swimming in the Devil's Pool at Victoria Falls
  4. Visa Personal Password Phishing Scam
  5. Mia Heyns Make-A-Wish Foundation Hoax
  6. Our Lady of Guadalupe Chain Email
  7. Heineken Beer Company Promotion Scam
  8. Person On The Bridge Hoax Email
  9. Snake Caught in Spider's Web Photographs
  10. F-15 Crash Sequence Images
  11. Redneck Mansion Photograph
  12. Interpol Funds Recovery Scam
  13. Siamese Pike Photograph
  14. Seventeen Pound Russian Baby Photographs
  15. Heathrow Boeing 777 Crash - RF Interference Rumour

Issue 81 Start Menu

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Mia Heyns Make-A-Wish Foundation Hoax

Summary:
Message claims that, every time the message is sent on, the Make-A-Wish Foundation will donate money to help pay the medical bills of a seriously ill teenager named Mia Heyns (Full commentary below).



Status:
False

Example:(Submitted, April 2008)
Hi, my name is MIA HEYNS.

I am 19 years old, and I have severe lung cancer . I also have a large tumour in my brain, from repeated beatings Doctors say I will die soon if this isn't fixed, and my family can't pay the bills. The Make A Wish Foundation has agreed to donate R7 for every time This message is sent on.

For those of you who send this along, I thank you so much, but for those who don't send it, what goes around comes around. Have a Heart, please send this.

Please, if you are a kind person, send this on.
PLEASE HIT FORWARD BUTTON NOT REPLY BUTTON.

YOUR'S FAITHFULLY,

MIA HEYNS




Commentary:
Like many other charity email hoaxes, this nonsensical message claims that you can help a sick youngster simply by sending the message on to other people.

The message claims that the Make-A-Wish Foundation will help pay medical expenses for severely ill 19 year old Mia Heyns by donating a specified amount of money every time the message is sent to others. The message is circulating via social networking website, Facebook and via email.

Supposedly, Mia has a brain tumor and lung cancer and will die unless expensive medical treatments are provided. However, this sad tale is just one more in a long line of virtually identical, and equally absurd, hoax messages. From time to time some prankster substitutes a new name and changes a few detail before launching the altered hoax anew. One of the earliest versions was a message that claimed that recipients could help 7 year old Amy Bruce by forwarding the email. As the following example shows, the Mia Heyns version is almost identical to the original Amy Bruce version:
Hi, my name is Amy Bruce.

I am 7 years old, and I have severe lung cancer . I also have a large tumor in my brain, from repeated beatings. Doctors say I will die soon if! this isn't fixed, and my family can't pay the bills. The Make A Wish Foundation, has agreed to donate 7 cents for every time this message is sent on. For those of you who send this along, I thank you so much, but for those who don't send it, what goes around comes around. Have a Heart, please send this.

Please, if you are a kind person, send this on.

PLEASE HIT FORWARD BUTTON NOT REPLY BUTTON.

YOUR'S FAITHFULLY,
AMY BRUCE
No legitimate organization would ever participate in a fund-raising campaign based on how many times a particular message was sent to others. Any such claim is simply ridiculous. Even in the vastly unlikely event that an organization was to agree to such a scheme, there is simply no reliable or ethical method of tracking the random journeys of a particular message and therefore no way to accurately calculate the final amount to be donated. Moreover, there is no sane reason why any organization would base the amount of funds to be donated on how many times a particular message was sent on.

The Make-A-Wish Foundation publicly denies any involvement in these absurd chain letters on its website. The heartless and irresponsible imbeciles that create such hoaxes use the name of the Make-A-Wish Foundation in their messages without the permission of the organization. These hoaxes are far from harmless. Organization staff must waste time and effort responding to questions about the seemingly endless succession of stupid hoax messages. The Foundation notes on its website:
The time and expense required to respond to these inquiries distracts the Foundation from its efforts on behalf of children with life-threatening medical conditions, and more importantly, can divulge information that is potentially harmful to a child and his or her family.
These messages exploit the natural human kindness of recipients who are happy to forward the nonsense onward because they honestly believe that they are helping a sick child or teenager by doing so. Don't fall for such tricks! Any message that claims that money will be donated every time the message is forwarded is virtually certain to be a hoax. If you receive such a message, please do not send it to others. And please take a moment to let the sender know that the information in the message is untrue.

References:
Charity Hoaxes
Amy Bruce Charity Hoax
Make-A-Wish Foundation: Chain Letters

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Issue 81 Start Menu

Pages in this month's issue:
  1. Mail Server Report Life is Beautiful Virus Hoax
  2. Bump Car MS-13 Gang Initiation Warning
  3. Swimming in the Devil's Pool at Victoria Falls
  4. Visa Personal Password Phishing Scam
  5. Mia Heyns Make-A-Wish Foundation Hoax
  6. Our Lady of Guadalupe Chain Email
  7. Heineken Beer Company Promotion Scam
  8. Person On The Bridge Hoax Email
  9. Snake Caught in Spider's Web Photographs
  10. F-15 Crash Sequence Images
  11. Redneck Mansion Photograph
  12. Interpol Funds Recovery Scam
  13. Siamese Pike Photograph
  14. Seventeen Pound Russian Baby Photographs
  15. Heathrow Boeing 777 Crash - RF Interference Rumour