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Facebook Money For Likes Hoax - Baby With Many Cuts on Face


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Outline

Facebook message featuring a picture of a baby with many cuts on his face claims that the baby has cancer and that Facebook will donate money to help him each time a user likes, shares, or comments on the picture.

Facebook Hoax



Brief Analysis

The message is a disgraceful hoax. The intention of the post is to amass likes for a particular Facebook Page and further promote the page via shares and comments. The baby in the picture does not have cancer. His injuries were inflicted by his own mother who stabbed him repeatedly with a pair of scissors. Sending on this nasty hoax will do nothing whatsoever to help this baby.

   

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Example

HE IS SUFFERING FROM
CANCER..!!!
Please Don't Ignore!
FACEBOOK DONATE FOR:
LIKE : 1 $
COMMENT : 3 $
SHARE : 10 $
IGNORE : IF U DON'T CARE

Baby with Cuts on Face



Detailed Analysis

This Facebook message features a picture of a baby with many small cuts on his face. According to the message, the baby is suffering from cancer but users can help just by liking, sharing and commenting on the baby's picture. The message claims that Facebook will donate $1 for every like, $3 for every comment and $10 for every share. A caption on the picture also makes the claim that one like equates to one prayer.

However, the claims in the message are heinous lies. Liking, sharing and commenting on the picture will do nothing whatsoever to help him. Facebook certainly will not donate money as claimed.

Moreover, the person who created the hoax cares not one iota for this baby's welfare. The goal of the despicable individual who created the hoax is simply to garner attention for his or her Facebook Page by tricking people into liking, sharing and commenting.  By using such underhand tactics, the Page manager can significantly increase the popularity and like-count of the Page.

Unfortunately, this example is only one in a constant stream of these vile hoaxes.

The baby in the picture is (then) 8-month-old Xiao Bao from southern China. He does not have cancer as claimed in the hoax message. In fact, he sustained the wounds when his mother attacked him with a pair of scissors after he bit her while breast-feeding. His picture was stolen from news articles about the case and republished in the hoax message.

Any message that claims that Facebook or any other company will donate money to help a sick or injured child in exchange for liking, sharing or commenting is sure to be a hoax. And, the premise that liking or sharing somehow equates to prayers is beyond ridiculous.

Last updated: May 16, 2015
First published: October 10, 2013
By Brett M. Christensen
About Hoax-Slayer

References
Charity Hoaxes
Facebook Sick Child Hoaxes
Baby stabbed 90 times with scissors by mother for biting her while she was breastfeeding him






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