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'Saved by the Bell' Star Dennis Haskins Is NOT Dead


Outline

Message being shared via social media claims that American actor Dennis Haskins, who is best known for his role as principal Richard Belding in the sitcom 'Saved by the Bell', has been killed in a car accident.

Dennis haskin death hoax
© Depositphotos.com/ Aquir014b

Brief Analysis

The claims in the message are false. Dennis Haskins is alive and has not been involved in a car accident. The false death claims come via a report on the fake-news website, Circus News Network. Nothing published on the site should be taken seriously.

Example

'Saved by the Bell' Star Dennis Haskins Killed in Automobile Accident

Dennis Haskins, best known for his role as principal Richard Belding in the teen sitcom Saved by the Bell, which ran from 1989 to 1993 on NBC, died in a single vehicle crash on Tennessee State Route 66 near Sevierville.


Detailed Analysis

Post Claims Dennis Haskins Killed in Car Accident

A message circulating via Facebook and Twitter claims that American actor Dennis Haskins has died in a car accident. Haskins is perhaps best known for his role as principal Richard Belding in the sitcom 'Saved by the Bell'.

The message links to a longer report that claims that the actor 'died in a single vehicle crash on Tennessee State Route 66 near Sevierville' and was identified by photo ID found at the scene.

Report is False - Dennis Haskins is Not Dead

However, the claims in the report are untrue. Dennis Haskins is alive and has not been involved in a car accident as claimed.

The message and linked report originate from the fake-news website Circus News Network (CNN.com.so), which apparently considers itself satirical. None of the reports published on the site are genuine news stories. The site acknowledges the fictional nature of its material via a clause buried in its terms of service document, which reads:
Circus News Network articles are drawn from a number of different sources and many are fictitious or satirical. Circus News Network uses invented names in some stories, except in cases where public figures are being satirized. Any other use of real names is accidental and coincidental. The reader should suspend disbelief for the sake of enjoyment. Any further disclaimers neglected to be made are hereby reserved.
CNN.com.so reports are presented in news format. And, because of the site's web address, readers may mistakenly believe that they are on the CNN.com news website. A disclaimer at the bottom of the site's pages notes that it is not associated with Cable News Network (CNN.com). However, many readers may not notice this disclaimer.

Thus, many readers are likely to think that the stories on the site are factual and share them with others.

Fake-News Sites Abound - Verify Before Sharing

In recent years, many fake-news websites have appeared. These sites churn out an endless supply of bogus reports that circulate far and wide, spreading confusion and misinformation as they travel. These sites often claim to be satirical, but much of the material they publish could hardly be considered deserving of a satire tag. For example, at least in this writer's opinion, there is nothing remotely satirical, entertaining, or funny in publishing a false news report claiming that someone has died in a car accident.

It is therefore wise to check the veracity of any 'news' reports that come your way via social media before you share them with your friends. Celebrity deaths - even the deaths of those less well known - are sure to be covered by mainstream news and entertainment websites. So, a quick search via Google News or another news portal should reveal if a celebrity death report is true or false




© Depositphotos.com/s_bukley


Last updated: September 3, 2014
First published: September 3, 2014
By Brett M. Christensen
About Hoax-Slayer

References
‘Saved by the Bell’ Star Dennis Haskins Killed in Automobile Accident
Circus News Network - Terms of Use
Identifying Fake-News Articles and Websites