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Nonsensical Hoax - Fungus Shiue Share Image to Get Money in Four Days

Outline
Social media message claims that, according to the Chinese art of "fungus shiue", those who share an attached image depicting a very large amount of cash will receive money in four days.


© Depositphotos.com/ Tatyana Nikitina



Brief Analysis
Of course, the message is utter drivel. It is an abridged version of several earlier hoaxes that involved a supposedly rare calendric event based on Chinese Feng Shui. It may have been created as a parody of the earlier hoaxes. Nevertheless, many people are sharing it "just in case". The image actually depicts cash seized during a Mexican drug raid in March 2007.

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Example

To share! This only happens. Every 823 years! Share and you'll receive money in 4 days! If you don't share and look at the image you'll stay poor! According to the Chinese art of fungus Shiue. Just in case gonna share!

http://www.hoax-slayer.com/images/mexico-drug-money5.jpg


Detailed Analysis


According to a message that is currently being shared vigorously via social media, users who share and look at an image depicting a room-sized haul of cash will receive money in four days. But, warns the message, those who don’t share will stay poor. Supposedly, the event only occurs every 823 years and is based on the Chinese art of fungus shiue.  

Of course, the message is superstitious drivel with nary a grain of truth. Moreover, it is derived from a long running series of hoaxes involving a supposedly special calendar event and Chinese Feng Shui. The earlier hoaxes claim - falsely - that a specified combination of three consecutive days that occur five times in a month is a magical event that takes place once every 823 years and will result in the arrival of money for those who share and poverty for those who don't.

But, this version omits the calendar references and can't even get the name of the Chinese art right, referring to it rather amusingly as "fungus shiue" rather than "feng shui". In fact, this version of the hoax may have been launched as a deliberate parody of the earlier versions. Parody or not, however, many people are passing on the image and message as instructed, "just in case it works".

The image used in the hoax depicts a huge amount of cash seized by law enforcement officers during a drug raid in Mexico in 2007. The image, along with other pictures of the gigantic haul, is featured in a story about the Mexican drug raid that has circulated for several years.  

Sharing such nonsense "just in case" may seem comparatively harmless. But, it will further clutter social media news feeds already groaning under the weight of oceans of inane drivel. And, it is likely to make those who share look foolish and naive in the eyes of at least some of their social media friends.

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Last updated: August 27, 2013
First published: August 27, 2013
By Brett M. Christensen
About Hoax-Slayer

References
March 2013 - Five Fridays, Five Saturdays, Five Sundays
Mexican Drug Money Photos




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