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Girl Who Killed Herself Virus Warning Hoax


Outline

Post circulating via Facebook warns users not to open any message about "a girl who killed herself over something her father wrote on her wall" because the message contains a self-replicating Trojan virus.

Brief Analysis

The warning is a hoax. There is no virus with the characteristics described in this bogus warning message. Reposting the message serves only to spread false information.

Example

WARNING !! WARNING !! EXTREME VIRUS THREAT!!

If you see anything about A GIRL WHO KILLED HERSELF OVER SOMETHING HER FATHER WROTE ON HER WALL!!! ***DO*** NOT*** OPEN***

YOU will NOT be able to delete This self -replicating Trojan virus!!

PLEASE PASS ALONG QUICKLY BEFORE SOMEONE ......OPENS IT !!"

Detailed Analysis

Yet another "virus warning" message is currently circulating via Facebook. The posts warn Facebook users to watch out for any message about "a girl who killed herself over something her father wrote on her wall". According to the "warning", opening such messages will unleash a "self-replicating Trojan virus" that the user will not be able to delete.

However, the warning is a hoax. Security firm, Sophos, has confirmed that there is no virus (or Trojan) like the one described in this bogus warning message. People are reposting this warning in the belief that they are helping friends and family members avoid a dangerous computer security threat. In reality, perpetrating the hoax will help no one and may actually cause more problems than a genuine threat. In an August 6, 2010 blog entry about this hoax, computer security expert Graham Cluley notes:
Ironically, the warning about the hoax is spreading faster and wider, and is probably more of a nuisance, than any genuine infection. For those who care about such things, viruses and Trojan horses are different types of malware - it's not possible to have a virus which is a Trojan horse. And by their very nature, Trojan horses cannot be self-replicating.

Furthermore, there's no such thing as malware that you can't remove so the claim that it "will not allow you to delete it" is nonsense too.
If this pointless hoax message comes your way, please do not pass it on to others. Passing on such hoax warnings does nothing more than spread misinformation.

This hoax warning may have arisen out of other widely circulated Facebook rumours about a young woman who allegedly killed herself after being bullied on Facebook. Some versions of the rumour suggest that the girl killed herself because of comments made on Facebook by her father or mother. Moreover, Internet rogues are now exploiting these rumours - and the fake virus warnings - by setting up bogus Facebook pages that promise to provide all the shocking details about the supposed suicide - as soon as the user has "liked" the page, shared it with others, and provided personal details on a scammy third party website.

Before you pass on any virus warning you receive via social networking websites or email, be sure to check if the warning is valid.



Last updated: 13th August 2010
First published: 13th August 2010
Article written by Brett M. Christensen
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References
Girl who killed herself virus hoax spreads on Facebook
Beware of Dubious Facebook 'Free Offer' Groups
Should Virus Warning Emails be Forwarded?






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