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IceLift Free Human Hibernation Email Forward

Summary:
Email claims that recipients who forward the message to at least five other people have a chance to have their body frozen free for 50 years by new human cryogenics company, IceLift (Full commentary below).



Status:
False

Example:(Submitted, September 2007)
Subject: Live 50 years for FREE

Don't miss this GREAT OPPORTUNITY! You won't pay a buck for next 50 YEARS! And you may transfer this right to ANY person!

Just send this mail to at least five friends and - write to cc the address [Removed]

Don't believe?

Here is the EXPLANATION:
IceLift.com company promotes its new service of human hibernation for 50 years and this mail is something like its advertisement. Everybody who sends it to at least five persons (and one copy to Icelift) attends a big draw - and the winner gets FREEZING for 50 years for free. The prize is transferrable to any person.

Don't miss the PRIZE! Send this mail to 5 people NOW! DON'T forget to send a copy to [Removed]!



Commentary:
According to this email, the recipient can go in the draw to win 50 years of human hibernation provided by IceLift, a company that claims it will soon be offering human cryogenic services to clients. The message claims that all the recipient has to do to enter the draw is forward the email to 5 or more other people.

IceLift is apparently a real entity, although it is not yet fully operational. Details about the company are so far rather sketchy, but it does have a website that presents some information about cryogenic services soon to be offered. At first glance, the email forward may seem like a thinly disguised, if rather lame, attempt to promote the new company. However, Mary Wanecki, the PR & Marketing manager of IceLift, has assured me that the company is not responsible for the email forward although they are aware of its existence.

The email is similar to a long line of other giveaway hoaxes, including the free Sony Ericsson phone hoax. No legitimate, sensibly run company is likely to use the random forwarding of an email to offer promotional giveaways of this nature. Such emails can continue circulating for years, cluttering inboxes and wasting the time of company staff who must answer endless questions about the fake promotions featured in the messages.

According to the IceLift website, the project has the necessary technology to effectively slow down human functions so that a participant would only age about 482 days if "frozen" for fifty years. Therefore, claims the site, participants can be unfrozen in the future and begin a new life. Many readers would consider these claims to be quite incredible, the stuff of science fiction. Others may believe that the supposed project is no more than a prank. However, Mary Wanecki insists that the project is not a joke and promises that more information will be published within the next few months. The true status of the IceLift project will perhaps be more apparent when this new information becomes available.

Other companies have offered human cryogenic services in the past. However, these companies have basically operated on the quite questionable premise that a future society will have gained the necessary technology to revive and reanimate their clients. Thus, if it turns out that this future society has not achieved such a sophisticated level of technology after all, clients of these companies are likely to linger indefinitely as human popsicles.

Regardless of the IceLift Project's status, now or in the future, it presents an interesting concept and is bound to create a lot of lively debate. I will await further developments with interest.

References:
Giveaway Hoaxes
Sony Ericsson Phone Giveaway Hoax
Human hibernation project - IceLift
Corpses Frozen for Future Rebirth by Arizona Company

Last updated: 1st October 2007
First published:1st October 2007

Write-up by Brett M. Christensen