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Nestle Banana Baby Food Recall Warning

Outline
Circulating message warns that Nestle (or Gerber) is recalling all banana baby food with 2012 expiry dates because jars may contain pieces of glass.



Brief Analysis
The warning is derived from a genuine recall, but, in its current form, it is misleading and inaccurate. It is true that Nestle France has voluntarily recalled a specific batch of "P'tit Pot" banana baby food as a precaution due to possible broken glass contamination. However, the problem is confined to one batch and affects a product that is sold only in France. A second, even more inaccurate, incarnation of the message changes the company name from Nestle to Gerber. Gerber is a US based subsidiary of Nestle, but has no connection whatsoever to this Nestle France recall.

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Detailed analysis and references below example.



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Last updated: 5th July 2011
First published: 8th July 2011
Article written by Brett M. Christensen
About Brett Christensen and Hoax-Slayer


Example
PRODUCT RECALL. Important alert for all parents, Nestle is asking everyone to return all banana baby food expiring 2012; they may contain pieces of glass. Please copy and paste for all moms and babies safety!!!

Nestle Baby Food Recall Warning Facebook

Nestle Baby Food Recall Warning Facebbok Twitter


IMPORTANT ALERT: Gerber is asking everyone to return all banana baby food expiring 2012; they may contain pieces of glass. Please copy and paste for all moms and babies safety..bar code 761303308973



Detailed Analysis
According to this warning, which is currently circulating via Facebook and Twitter as well as via email, Nestle has issued a recall of all banana baby food with a 2012 expiry date because the containers may contain broken glass. The message asks that recipients pass on the information as a means of warning other parents about the potential danger.

The warning is derived from a genuine product recall. However, because it omits important information about where the recall was issued and what batch of products the recall applies to, the warning is potentially misleading. In late June, 2011, Nestle France issued a voluntary recall of banana flavoured Pítit Pot baby food as a precautionary measure after a mother found a piece of glass in a jar of the product. However, the potential contamination affects a particular batch of the product that is sold only in France. The recalled products have the batch number 10980295 L and the bar code 7 613033089732 with an expiry date of October 2012. No other products in the Pítit Pot range are affected.

A June 30 report about the recall published on FoodProductionDaily website notes:
The company said some 34,000 pots of the product made in the same batch were being recalled and advised consumers who had purchased the affected run not to use them.

The problem is confined to France with the recall centred on banana flavoured Pítit Pot sold in lots of two 80 gram jars. No other cases of glass contamination have been reported to date, said the company today.
And a notice published on the Nestle France website (Google translated to English below) explains:
As a precaution, we decided to voluntarily recall a batch of the product "Little Pot" recipe banana, the Nestlť brand, due to the presence of possible risk of broken glass.

To identify the products concerned, please refer to the use-by date and lot number located on the edge of the cover:
Use by date: 10/2012
Lot Number: 10980295 L
These pots are sold in packs of two glass jars of 80g.

As a preventive measure, we ask you not to use them.
Other batches of the recipe P'tit Pot Banana, others in the range "Little Pot" and the product ranges "Maid Recipe" and "NaturNes" are not affected.

The product in question is only sold in France.
Consumers with infants in France should certainly check that they do not have any of the Nestle baby food products that have been recalled.

However, in its current form, this recall warning is inaccurate and potentially misleading. The warning makes no mention of what batch of the product was recalled or which country the recall was issued in. These omissions mean that people all over the world may mistakenly believe that baby food products that they may have are potentially contaminated. Such inaccurate warnings can cause unnecessary alarm among consumers. If you decide to pass on this warning, please include specific information about the affected batch as detailed above and be sure to clearly state that the recall applies to a specific product that is sold only in France.

An updated version of the message changes the company name from Nestle to Gerber. Gerber, which was formerly an American owned company, is now a US based subsidiary of Nestle. Gerber has no connection with the Nestle France recall. Geber baby food products distributed in the United States are not affected by the Nestle France recall.

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Nestle orders French baby food recall on glass contamination fears
Product recall 'Little Pot' recipe banana (Translated)
Rappel de produits "P'tit pot" recette Banane



Last updated: 5th July 2011
First published: 8th July 2011
Article written by Brett M. Christensen
About Brett Christensen and Hoax-Slayer