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PRANK - 'England Gets Second Chance as Ref Charged'


Outline

Circulating news snippet appearing to be from the BBC claims that England has been given a replay game against Uruguay in the World Cup after the referee was charged with match fixing and bribery.

Facebook phising
© Depositphotos.com/ gubh83

Brief Analysis

The claims in the message are untrue and it is not from the BBC. It is just a prank. Clicking the link in the message will take you to a webpage that informs you that you have been tricked and that the post was just a joke. The site allows you to create your own fake news message and share it via social media to prank your friends.

Example

ENGLAND GET SECOND CHANCE AS REF IS CHARGED WITH MATCH FIXING OFFENCES

BREAKING NEWS - England are to be given a second chance replay against Uruguay as it emerges the referee in charge of tonight's fixture is charged with match fixing offences and bribery..

Prank england survey scam.


Detailed Analysis

According to this 'breaking news' message, which is circulating via social media, England will get a second chance game against Uruguay in the World Cup after the referee in the original game was charged with match fixing and bribery.  The message, which includes the BBC news logo, invites users to click a link to read the full article. The link seemingly points to a BBC News website.

Message is Just a Prank:

However, English fans may be left disappointed.  The claims in the message are untrue. England will not get a reply game against Uruguay and the referee has not been charged as claimed. If you do click the link in the hope of reading the article, you will be taken to a webpage that 'owns up' to the prank via the following message:

WE ARE SORRY, BUT YOU WERE TRICKED! IT WAS JUST A JOKE!!!

Site Encourages You to Create Your Own Pranks:

The page invites you to create your very own fake news story so that you can prank your friends. A form on the website allows you to plug in a few details to generate a prank story that you can then share via social media.

Be Careful When Clicking Links

This message is just a silly prank and is relatively harmless. However, scammers often use fake 'breaking news' stories to trick people into visiting sites that harbour malware or participating in survey scams. Use caution and common sense when clicking links in posts that seemingly point to breaking news stories. Searching a news aggregator service such as Google News should quickly reveal if a story is genuine.



Last updated: June 23, 2014
First published: June 23, 2014
Written by Brett M. Christensen
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References
ENGLAND GET SECOND CHANCE AS REF IS CHARGED WITH MATCH FIXING OFFENCES
Facebook Survey Scams