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FALSE - Facebook Warning About Morphine in Chocolate Chick Smarties


Outline

Viral Facebook message describes a case in which a child became seriously ill after eating Smarties from a chocolate chick and was later found to have morphine in his body.

Facebook phising
© Depositphotos.com/ BorbelySissy

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Brief Analysis

Humberside Police and the National Crime Agency investigated the incident and found no evidence to link the product with the child's illness. The claim that the Smarties contained morphine that made the child sick has no basis in fact. Sending on this message will serve only to raise unnecessary fear and alarm. If you receive this message, please do not share it with others.

Scroll down to read a detailed analysis with references.


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Example

PLEASE SHARE this chocolate chick was bought for my son on friday from sainsburys, immediately after eating the smarties inside Finley complained of tummy pains resulting in severe vomiting and a small seizure, within half hour of eating Finley was in hospital found with MORPHINE in his body! He is now at home on the mend. PLEASE BE WARY OF THIS PRODUCT!

smarties bird


Detailed Analysis

According to a message that has been circulating on Facebook, parents should be wary of giving their children a 'chocolate chick' that contains Smarties chocolates inside. The message describes a case in which a child became very ill after eating the Smarties and, after being taken to a hospital, was found to have morphine in his body. The message includes a photograph of one of the chocolate chicks.

While the warning may have grown out of a genuine misunderstanding on the part of the child's parents, subsequent police investigations found no links between the Smarties and the child's illness. Nestle, the company that makes Smarties, has issued the following statement about the incident:
The family were naturally very concerned, and suggested that a Smarties Choc Chic may have caused their son’s illness.  We were therefore working with the family, and the Humberside Police and National Crime Agency who investigated the incident, to help establish what happened.  However, there was no evidence to indicate that the Smarties Choc Chic was the source of the child’s illness. We have rigorous quality procedures in our factories to ensure the safety of our products and we are entirely confident that Smarties Choc Chic are safe.
Thus, the claims that the Smarties somehow contained morphine that made the child ill are clearly untrue.

The continued circulation of this message will serve only to raise unnecessary fear and alarm. If the message comes your way, please do not share it with others. And please let the poster know that the information is untrue.


Last updated: April 12, 2014
First published:April 8, 2014
Written by Brett M. Christensen
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References
Nestle - Facebook






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